The Fantastico Manifesto

Big music fan, big pop-culture aficionado. Always interesting, always Jonny.

15 Oct So even though I stopped watching the show early last season (oddly enough, due to something the character of Finn Hudson uttered to Sue Sylvester and her mentally disabled child, no less), I sat down over the weekend and tuned into the episode of Glee that memorialized his character (as well as the actor who portrayed him, Cory Monteith) entitled The Quarterback.
And I made it about 10 minutes before I turned it off in complete disgust and anger.
Although I totally understood they were just acting, I didn’t need to hear Puck go after Kurt, who is obviously one of the characters who would be in the deepest of mourning and make some off-handed gay joke about “bedazzling” Finn’s letterman jacket when Finn’s mother allowed him to have it. No. Just no.
I was kind of done by that point, but a friend on Facebook told me that I really owed it to the episode (and I suppose, the memory of Cory) to give it a full chance and watch the entire thing.
So after a few moments of calming down and not wanting to lunge at my television, I continued watching. Although I still believe that little scene was uncalled for (I got where Puck was going, sure, but it just could’ve been pulled off differently considering the sadness surrounding everything), there were some extremely moving moments and tear-filled winks to the past.
I read a couple of recaps on the episode and I found that many people used a surprising word to describe it, but one that makes the most sense: “uncomfortable”. I suppose that being a witness to the death of another through any means is truly uncomfortable, but in that weirdness, there is a piece of sanity we’re able to capture — maybe because it helps us show that we’re not alone in our sadness or hurt of missing someone no longer with us. 
It’s hard to define and I guess in full, the episode was truly undefinable as a whole… so I have to give it up to the cast and crew for pulling together something like this. At the most common level, it was as real as things could be regarding the all-too-soon passing of someone they truly loved.
There were honestly a couple of odd blips here and there (Puck’s initial reaction and of course, that strange ending — I’m sorry, but Mr. Schuester has become one of the creepiest teachers in television history (and yes, I suppose you can reply that being that close to his students over all of this time; something that most teachers wouldn’t have considering their influx of new students to watch over every semester) ), but it was pretty OK.
The end game? Cory Monteith, you’re still incredibly missed and loved. May you forever rest.

So even though I stopped watching the show early last season (oddly enough, due to something the character of Finn Hudson uttered to Sue Sylvester and her mentally disabled child, no less), I sat down over the weekend and tuned into the episode of Glee that memorialized his character (as well as the actor who portrayed him, Cory Monteith) entitled The Quarterback.

And I made it about 10 minutes before I turned it off in complete disgust and anger.

Although I totally understood they were just acting, I didn’t need to hear Puck go after Kurt, who is obviously one of the characters who would be in the deepest of mourning and make some off-handed gay joke about “bedazzling” Finn’s letterman jacket when Finn’s mother allowed him to have it. No. Just no.

I was kind of done by that point, but a friend on Facebook told me that I really owed it to the episode (and I suppose, the memory of Cory) to give it a full chance and watch the entire thing.

So after a few moments of calming down and not wanting to lunge at my television, I continued watching. Although I still believe that little scene was uncalled for (I got where Puck was going, sure, but it just could’ve been pulled off differently considering the sadness surrounding everything), there were some extremely moving moments and tear-filled winks to the past.

I read a couple of recaps on the episode and I found that many people used a surprising word to describe it, but one that makes the most sense: “uncomfortable”. I suppose that being a witness to the death of another through any means is truly uncomfortable, but in that weirdness, there is a piece of sanity we’re able to capture — maybe because it helps us show that we’re not alone in our sadness or hurt of missing someone no longer with us.

It’s hard to define and I guess in full, the episode was truly undefinable as a whole… so I have to give it up to the cast and crew for pulling together something like this. At the most common level, it was as real as things could be regarding the all-too-soon passing of someone they truly loved.

There were honestly a couple of odd blips here and there (Puck’s initial reaction and of course, that strange ending — I’m sorry, but Mr. Schuester has become one of the creepiest teachers in television history (and yes, I suppose you can reply that being that close to his students over all of this time; something that most teachers wouldn’t have considering their influx of new students to watch over every semester) ), but it was pretty OK.

The end game? Cory Monteith, you’re still incredibly missed and loved. May you forever rest.

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